Saturday, October 24, 2009

Chepstow Acoustic Music Club

One of Cheppers' local pubs hosted the first of these nights yesterday.

Having not read the flyer properly, I was expecting a tiny bar enlivened in an either deafening or muffled manner by young men playing moody indie/rock. It was more of a well-behaved, properly organised folk event, in fact. Folk music is big in this neck of the woods.

We were among the youngest, thinnest and most conservative of hairstyle in the room. But it was nice. High standard of music; a genuine sense of community; a bit sentimental and a bit of a laugh.

I think we'll go back. Maybe even to play. I can see the Pottersons in ten years time being right at home in such a club. But Jon won't have a ponytail. And I doubt I'll become buxom.

Tuesday, October 20, 2009

There's no I in Team. Or something.


A couple of recent events at church have focused on change/looking back on what's past/moving into what's new.

It's pretty easy to come up with biblical characters who went through huge personal or societal changes (be that by determination, accident or even under duress.) From Adam & Eve to the prophets to the disciples. A veritable shedload of examples.

This, combined with the unnerving habit churches get into of treating their congregations like misbehaving sales reps, means we are easily duped into believing we're the dormant key to a Christian revolution. If we could just figure out how to change that little, inscrutable thing we must be getting wrong, we'd awaken our potential and find ourselves swept away by a revival.

Thing is, I guess stories were included in the bible because they covered moments of significance. And even given the understandable editorial preference for activity as opposed to inactivity, the book lists generation after generation of people who saw God do nothing at all worth noting.

It's ever so slightly difficult to accept that God's call on my Christian life may just be to plod on faithfully and pass my understanding of my faith onto my friends and any children who may come along.

You often hear "what would you do if you knew Jesus was coming back tomorrow?". Well, yes. But to nick a phrase from Brian McLaren, "what would you do if you knew he wasn't coming back for 10,000 years?"

Takes more guts to face up to the latter, in my case. I'd much rather believe I'm about to usher in the new kingdom myself. With humility, bien sur.